FLU STUDY

About Flu Vaccination

Our Ongoing Research

The purpose of our ongoing Flu Study is to determine if a subject’s level of inflammation determines their response to vaccination. The aging process and type-2 diabetes are associated with chronic inflammation. Those affected also have higher rates of influenza disease and higher health care costs, and as a result, the flu vaccine is a recommended standard of care preventative treatment. However, vaccines are less effective in aging and diabetic individuals. We theorize that any age or disease-related conditions that increase the level of inflammation in your body will make vaccines, like the flu shot, less effective. Understanding this relationship between inflammation and vaccination could lead to vaccines that are more effective for the aging, the diabetic and for those with compromised immune systems.

Results

Data is currently being collected and analyzed from the 2016 Flu Study Norton Lab is performing in parternship with the Tulane CTU (LA CaTS Clinical and Translational Science Center). If you are a subject who has participated in the 2016 Flu Study, your de-identified results will be posted here when they are available. These results will include:

Serum CRP levels

  • Serum C-Reactive Protein or CRP is a marker of acute or general inflammation, it is not diagnostic by itself for any disease. In general, a CRP levels less than 1 mg/L is considered a normal level or low inflammatory status. A level between 1-3 mg/L is considered moderate level or inflammatory status. A CRP level > 3 mg/L is considered a high level or inflammatory status. For more information see http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/c-reactive-protein/basics/results/prc-20014480. Note: All study results are for information purposes only. They are not intended to serve as medical diagnostics or in place of consulting with a medical practitioner.

Change in antibody responses against the flu vaccine

  • Antibody responses to seasonal flu vaccine are the main responses measured to determine if a person will be protected against circulating flu vaccines. Higher levels of antibodies in general correlate to better protection, including either high levels of antibodies prior to vaccination or a 4-fold increase in antibodies after vaccination. For more information see http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6207a1.htm?s_cid=rr6207a1_w#InfluenzaVaccineEffectiveness. Note: All study results are for information purposes only. They are not intended to serve as medical diagnostics or in place of consulting with a medical practitioner.

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